Call in to Radio


Tips for voicing your views on the radio

call in to radioDiscussions about popular issues often take place on local radio stations around the country. Talk radio as a listener-participation format has been in existence since the mid 1940s.

Daily segments on talk radio and many music-based radio stations are often hosted by an individual who may bring guests on the air for interviews. They also often take questions and feedback from the public who call in.

Contributions from the listening audience, via tuning in or calling in, help to attract ratings and advertising dollars to the station. Some stations such as public radio or non-commercial programs rely heavily on contributions from the general public.

Radio in general has most often been associated with the broadcast radio format, but now streaming online radio stations exist on the internet for an increased public access. Many stations incorporate music breaks or talking segment breaks to keep listeners engaged. Some stations are strictly considered “talk radio only” stations, and they can exist on AM as well as FM bands.

An important part of talk radio has always been the discussion and debate of political opinions, current events, and issues.

How to get your voice heard on the radio

The first thing to consider when wanting to voice your concerns on the air is the time of your call. Most talk shows can be hard to call in to – especially popular programs. Radio stations only have a certain number of open phone lines.

on-airTry to plan ahead to call right before the talking segment you wish to join. Often a commercial break is an opportune time to dial in. If you encounter a busy tone, simply try again. Calling in before the show starts may mean that the topics of discussion may not be announced yet, but the opportunity can be used to ask the call screener for details. The call screener is the gate keeper of calls. They check that a caller is not a prankster, can speak clearly enough to be heard, and will verify what it is that the caller wants to talk about. Be prepared to offer a short summary of what you want to discuss and try to make your point sound interesting or useful to them. National talk shows will likely be pickier during the screening process than some smaller local shows.

Your call will be put in a queue once you have passed the screening process. Be sure to have your topics and statements prepared beforehand. A few notes jotted down can really help you stay focused. Write down any specific questions you wish to ask the guest or host.

It is very important to remember to turn the volume of your radio way down or leave the room in which it is located while you are on the call. Radio signal feedback can ruin your chances of being heard, and may cause you to become disconnected altogether.

Aim to make your point quick and simple, but do speak slowly and clearly. Avoid using slang words, jargon, and especially avoid any profanity. Breathe slowly and focus on being calm, especially if the current discussion is already heated. Be courteous to the host and always thank them for including you.

Keep in mind that you do not have to begin by introducing yourself except maybe by first name and your location. If you have more than one statement or question, say so at the beginning so that the host knows. Simply state, “I have three things to quickly mention”, or something similar to that. Hold the listener’s attention by sharing your personal connection with the subject. A global issue can affect a small town issue – help you audience draw the connections in support of your statements.

If you feel that you cannot speak on the airwaves for any reason such as a cold or nervousness, remember that you can also email or fax your feedback to the station. Many hosts will read audience emails or faxed letters on the air if it pertains to their discussion subject matter. There may be a separate voice-mail line you could call as well so you may leave a message or comment that might be shared during the show.

Are you very knowledgeable about your subject and you can handle the limelight? Consider contacting your local stations to become a guest on one of their programs. If you are an expert in your field or a representative of a group or organization – being a guest is a great way to educate the public about your cause, campaign, or issue.

Below is a sample list of some of the radio stations in or around Horry County:

WNSY-FM Sunny 103.1 Oldies
(843)626-9103
Cumulus Media
11640 Highway 17 BYP South
Murrells Inlet, SC 29576
Phone:(843)651-7869
Fax:(843)651-9123

WNMB AM 900
(843)249-6662
429 Pine Ave
Myrtle Beach, SC 29566
For music and programming questions or requests, send email to: garyb@wnmb900.com

Sunny 106.5/WSYN
(843)651-7869
(843)651-8144
11826A Highway 17 BYP
Murrells Inlet, SC

WPJS Broadcasting
(843)365-4814
860 Golden Leaf Rd.
Conway, SC 29526

WPJS Gospel 1330 AM
(843)248-6365
1616 4th Ave.
Conway, South Carolina 29526

WYAV/Wave 104.1 FM Classic Rock
1016 Ocala St.
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577
Request Line: (843)626-9283
Business Line: (843)448-1041
Fax: (843)626-2508

WDZD-Lite 93.5 FM
(843)293-0107
4841 Highway 17 BYP South
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

WYAV/Wave 104.1 FM Classic Rock
1016 Ocala St.
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577
Request Line: (843)626-9283
Business Line: (843)448-1041
Fax: (843)626-2508

K-LOVE 88.9 FM Radio Contemporary Christian Music
and http://www.iheart.com/live/K-LOVE-5162/
1(800)525-5683
(843)399-9649
4337 Big Barn Dr.
Little River, SC 29566

WPJS Broadcasting
(843)365-4814
860 Golden Leaf Rd.
Conway, SC 29526

WPJS Gospel 1330 AM
(843)248-6365
1616 4th Ave.
Conway, South Carolina 29526

WDZD-Lite 93.5 FM
(843)293-0107
4841 Highway 17 BYP South
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

WWXM Mix 97.7 FM
(843) 293-0107
4841 Highway 17 BYP South
Myrtle Beach, SC 29577

1110AM / 99.3 FM WBT Charlotte’s News Talk
One Julian Price Place
Charlotte, NC 28208
Studio Line: (704)570-1110
News Room: (704)374-3883
wbtnews@wbt.com

Hot Talk WRNN 99.5
(843)839-9950

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